Book Review: The Marrow Thieves by Cherie Dimaline

 

marrowthieves

Reviewed by: Bethany
Genre: Fiction
Format: Softcover 

Page count: 180 pages
Rating: 4/5 stars
In stock: You know it.

This year’s theme: One Book to Open Your Eyes.

This is the first completed book in my journey (along with several coworkers) to read the Canada Reads shortlist. One down and four more to go before March 26th.

One of my reading goals from last year was to read more broadly – I tried to choose books written by women or people of colour…or women of colour! A lot of the Canada Reads titles take a step in that direction, which is exciting and important. Perspective is a cool thing.

The Marrow Thieves is being defended by Jully Black, who we all know and love from such jams as Sweat of Your Brow and Seven Day Fool. Jully Black already has me pumped for the debates next month, but I’m looking forward to hearing each panelist’s thoughts on this year’s topic – personally and in relation to the books.

The Marrow Thieves is set in a futuristic world where global warming has drastically changed the world’s landscape and, excluding North America’s Indigenous people, the general population is no longer able to dream. So, we meet Frenchie, a young Indigenous boy who is on the run from Recruiters who want to examine his bone marrow! Weird!

This book tackles two hot button issues: climate change and the disenfranchisement of Canada’s Indigenous people. Similar to when I read The Handmaid’s Tale, I’m bothered by how plausible this story is (aside from the marrow studying, of course). The global warming and the accompanying desperation is an uncomfortable foreshadowing.

Cherie Dimaline has written some fantastic characters! If you’re not emotionally attached to this group of people by the end of the book, then I worry about you. Speaking of the ending, it has the best/sweetest/cutest ending of all. The subject matter is a bummer, but I’m here for the end. I almost cried, which is saying something.

Let me tell you, you’d be a Seven Day Fool not to read this book. 😉

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Bethany's Reviews and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s